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In Sports and Other Arenas, Is It All About the Money and Winning?

In Sports and Other Arenas, Is It All About the Money and Winning?

By Dennis Loo (2/27/14)

Those who set the overall standards in our society celebrate the alleged virtues of money and winning. It's all about the money and winning is everything, they say.

But is this really true? Is it all about the money? Are those who come in second, the first "losers"?

While some individuals are certainly driven by their cravings for money, the really outstanding contributors in history weren’t motivated by the money – many of them did what they did before money was even available - but by the challenge of what they were doing. Michael Jordan, for example, is famously competitive and hates to lose at any game he’s playing whether it’s basketball, golf, cards, or what have you. While he certainly enjoys his money, his excellence didn’t derive from his thirst for the Benjamins. If it did then there would be a lot of Michael Jordans because there are many people who crave riches.

Steven Wozniack who created the first working Macs wanted to give the idea away to the world. In creating the first Apple computer he wasn't driven by the desire for money. His co-founder Steve Jobs convinced him that instead of giving the idea away to the world for free they should start a company.

Despite the conventional view that Jobs was a great inventor, what Jobs was was a brilliant marketer who understood that function and design should go together. The key ideas behind the Apple Computer were actually invented by the Palo Alto Research Group (PARC), brilliant inventive minds hired by Xerox to plot out the paperless future. When they came up with the first working PC and showed it to Xerox, Xerox executives were unmoved. Jobs heard about what PARC had done and asked to be shown it. When he was, he instantly recognized the importance of GUI (graphical user interface, the basis for the mouse), which Xerox failed to see.

When we were discussing in one of my classes yesterday why a student in the class loves sports she initially said that she watches sports to see who’s going to win, that it’s the winning that matters. But then she admitted that if the baseball score is 11 to 1 that it’s not interesting compared to when the game goes into extra innings and someone hits the go ahead run in overtime. So what she’s actually interested in isn’t the winning itself but the competition and the drama.

Why do we like stories and why do we like to watch those who excel at whatever they do? Is it because we want to see someone win for the sake of winning? If that were true then we’d not need to watch the game as long as we could see the final score and see that the team that we like has the winning score.

I know from personal experience as a player and as a coach that winning is way better than losing. It doesn’t matter what the stakes are, whether it’s the world championships or the YMCA youth basketball league. Winning feels wonderful and losing feels, at least some of the time, terrible.

But it’s not the winning itself that is the major appeal; it’s the process that leads to the outcome. Ask a top athlete – or even a weekend warrior – if they would be happy to be given the championship trophy through their opponent defaulting before the final. Almost all would say that they would much rather win it through having to take on and beat a formidable competitor. While it would be foolhardy to generalize about everyone’s reasons for enjoying sports or other arenas, it would be hard to refute the fact that for most people, it’s the game that’s the thing, not the winning in and of itself. Certainly there are those who will play only those who are inferior to them in ability so that they can win a lot. But they don’t make movies about such people and if they did, people wouldn’t watch those movies unless it was to make fun of such cheap "winners."

What the desire to win produces – or as is perhaps even more often the case, the hating to lose – is the doing of what you didn’t think you could do, the stretching to excel in the face of fear and difficulty against a determined and powerful adversary, which sometimes can be your own fears, and succeeding. That is what is so terrific about sports and other endeavors and what makes it such gripping drama to watch. Watching the last few holes at a tightly matched golf tournament, for example, isn’t mainly about the physical skills involved in golf. What makes a tight match of any kind so dramatic is the mental demands placed on the individual and what s/he does to conquer those demands. When it’s all on the line and people either choke under the pressure or rise to the occasion is what links these activities together.

Comments   

 
+1 # KG7 2014-02-28 02:23
I agree that once upon a time way back when, athletes played the game entirely motivated by the game, the challenge, and of course, winning. Like you said, the innovators of all different types of sports back then weren't even paid. It was considered a privilege to just put on a very simple uniform and take the field. Somewhere along the line, that desire was lost and replaced by greed (it's all about the $). Now an athlete is most likely to pick a franchise that will pay him/her the most. I'm not saying once they're on a team they don't try to win, I believe most do. But I think somewhere in the back of their mind they are thinking,"win or lose, I'm still getting paid." Maybe if we had a "winner" takes all matches we would see 100% effort out of every athlete on the field. Or even matches where no one gets paid at all.
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-1 # Dennis Loo 2014-02-28 04:08
I agree with you to some extent. I think you're absolutely right that the huge increase in pay to pro athletes has had the effects that you mention on many of the players. Sports has become big business (e.g, ESPN) and with so much spending and interest in sports, the owners are making so much money, they can and need to pay players better than before. On the other hand, my main point in the article was to refute the ideology that claims that money is the main or only motivator of people excelling in all different arenas, sports and elsewhere. Athletes, whether they are pros or amateurs, weekend warriors or international stars, love to play sports for the game. Money enters the picture for the professionals, but those who really excel are not primarily driven by the money. The people you're describing are more those who aren't the most elite athletes.
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+1 # KG7 2014-02-28 14:38
My daughters soccer coach is an excellent example of someone who isn't in it for the money. Her love for the sport shows in her dedication and commitment to the girls/team in terms of aiding them in any way necessary (even on her own time)so each player can strive to be the best athlete they can be.
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-1 # Dennis Loo 2014-02-28 04:09
cont.:

The heart of my argument is about what makes people love sports both as players and as spectators and what makes people love doing all other kinds of things such as hobbies or seeing someone who's a great musician or artist or craftsperson, etc.
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-1 # dgjr_91 2014-03-05 18:58
It's true that stars love to play sports for the love of the game, also that those who really excel are not those driven by the money. Those who excel try to be the best they can be in what they do, always want to be the one on top and don't like to fail. But what KG7 states is also true. Professionals usually tend to choose those franchises that are willing to raise their salary. They will continue to be doing what they love to do anyways except looking to be getting paid more. But I don't agree that the mentality of "win or lose, I'm still getting paid"is what runs through athletes mind. Like I said before athletes tend to want to be the best in what they do and don't like to fail, to lose in other words. They make an effort to be the best and make a positive impact in the sport to show people they do belong where they are and are worth the money they are being paid.
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-1 # AP158 2014-02-28 05:53
(Part 1)I absolutely agree how athletes tend to go for those million dollar contract teams instead for the teams that can offer them more experience and growth. I feel that we have seen many of those decisions made in the past few years in which some of the professional athletes are being paid millions a year; whereas, there are others who are struggling to meet ends meet even if they have an education. The type of work that is done in our society is paid unfairly. Some jobs that are for entertainment are the highest paying and those who help others are being paid the least. The individual with the normal every day job has to make sure that they don’t “loose” by making a mistake at work because if they do then they can lose their job. Whereas, professional players are on contracts so if they make a mistake and swing at the ball incorrectly then so be it, there will be other games. If they get benched then who cares they are still going to get paid.
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-1 # AP158 2014-02-28 05:54
(Part 2)The passion for sports is not present in all the players anymore. I feel that competition has lost its meaning when we think about it as “rivalry between two or more persons or groups for an object desired in common, usually resulting in a victor and a loser but not necessarily involving the destruction of the latter” (dictionary.com ). Today it does have the meaning of the destruction of a latter. It’s like the saying in the movie Talladega Nights "If you ain't first, you're last." This made me think about the correlation in jail, if you are not “winner” meaning the top boss; then you end up being seen as the “loser” the inmate that is bossed around by others. Although prisoners and players come from two different worlds at the end of the day there is still a similar correlation. In prison the winner and loser continue to be prisoners and in sports the winner and loser remain million dollar contact players.
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0 # Dennis Loo 2014-02-28 14:34
The main point of my article is that winning and money aren't actually the major motivator behind why people pursue sports and other endeavors.
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+1 # OLI 2014-03-01 23:19
If the main point isn't about winning or money that motivates people, could we argue that the main reason people play with such passion is to become legends within their respective career fields. Ex. Lance Armstrong, makes it to the pros get a physical by the team doctor and finds out he has cancer. The team that gave him the million dollar contract left him to fend for himself. Luckily for him he survived it and his main goal was to bounce back and make that team pay for betraying them. He won 7 TDF after, people say he cheated but he was just better at "doping" then the other competitors. He just wanted the fame and the money and winning was a by-product of his commitment to succeed.
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-1 # Daniel Carrillo 2014-03-01 00:18
For many of us, watching some form of competition can be highly entertaining, but I would argue this is only so because we have been socialized from a young age (men especially) to regard competition as a preferable, or default pastime. The reason for this is only because competition is one of the basic tenets of capitalism, and we live in a capitalistic society. Just as children are socialized from an early age, in regards to gender and racial identity, children are also taught to develop a sense of competition, and this sense of competition also underscores in them the concept of individualism, another core concept of capitalism. An attitude of "competition" and the "American Dream" narrative are deeply wrapped up in each other, and sold to the American public under the guise of "upward mobility."
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+1 # TiffyWiffy 2014-03-02 07:36
I never thought to view the reason for liking sports as playing into capitalism. I always viewed it as modern gladiatorial events. Athletes competing with each other for our entertainment. The victors are heralded as gods among men, and are rewarded with riches and fame. The difference being that people are competing not for their lives, but for a trophy. But when people do get hurt, it makes the match all the more exciting. For example, a lot of hockey fans that I know, love it when a fight breaks out on the ice. Violence seems to factor a lot into how entertaining a contact sport is.
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-1 # Rod24 2014-03-08 21:47
I never saw competition/spo rts as a form of capitalism. But I totally agree with you, I had never made the connection between competition and capitalism. It is true though, competition is, if not the biggest factor then a very big factor in the U.S. as well as individualism. Ppl feed off of both of these which capitalism cannot exist without. The interest of the individual is promoted to be much more important then anything else in this country. Basically, most ppl think, "if its not affecting me then why should it matter?"
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+1 # Daniel Carrillo 2014-03-01 00:19
If anyone would like to see the Cadillac commercial I was talking about in class a couple of weeks ago that extols capitalism, here is a link to it in a Huffington Post article. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/26/this-commercial-sums-up-e_n_4859040.html
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0 # Jasmin Burgos 2014-03-01 13:49
But it's not the winning itself that it's the major appeal; it's the process that leads to the outcome". I completely agree and I feel like the statement quoted above summarizes this article for me. I for example, do not consider myself sports fanatic, I just tend to watch well known games such as: super bowl, etc. because I like to go through the whole drama, suspense, etc. like Loo mentioned above. But it might be different for people who actually follow up with the games season after season. & then completely different for those who are actually playing. I remember being a basketball team in fourth grade, we lost every single game but we would enjoy it to the max. It would have been awesome to actually win a game but we were fine with just being able to play. I want to hope that professional players aren't just in it for the money but money.
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0 # Bland 2014-03-01 21:23
I definitely feel that overtime the sports industry has become consumed with the mighty dollar, from players and their outrageous contracts, to the facilities/orga nizations charging outrageous fees, the love of the game, the passion or competitive drive may still be present however it is shadowed by the dollar I have played and coached as well as watched my children participate in sports... No doubt about it, losing can be devastating, heartbreaking but also a learning experience and humbling , it's all a matter of perspective. In life we will not always win and we should use losing at sports as a way to teach how to learn from the experience and persevere I watch sports for the competition and usually pull for the underdog, they often have more fight.
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0 # KLR 2014-03-01 21:55
After reading this article, I have to say that winning by playing the game is how I see things. Being an athlete myself, I always wanted to win, but I didn't want the win to be given to me. The thrill of competition is what drove me. Of course I want to win at everything that I do, but I don't do it for the money. I do it for the love of the sport. As a fan, we sensationalize the pro athletes that we watch and base their ability on how much money that they make. This causes some of the pro athletes to worry more about getting paid than how the sport should be played. You see it all of the time. A pro player plays his heart out until they sign a large or max contract and usually they ease up on how hard they play because they aren't going to get paid extra for playing harder. It is just disheartening to see greed take over the love of any sport. But this all just comes back to us living in a capitalist world where people think that money is everything.
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0 # KLR 2014-03-01 22:01
@KG7: I agree that athletes in the past played with a lot more heart for the game because they were there to compete against the best. Now that most players are looking for the max contracts more than enjoying the art and sport of competition. That is why I love to watch youth sports because they are there because they want to compete against the best. They are the purest of sports competition.
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0 # LB11 2014-03-02 05:32
I completely agree with #KLR. I have met so many athletes who used to love playing sports when they were younger and all through out grade school, but once they start playing in college it became like a job and all about how much money you can make out of it. They eventually all say the same thing "its just not fun anymore". Those are the types of people who play sports simply for the love of playing. I believe that professional athletes are willing to put up with whatever they have to in order to bring in the big bucks even if that means playing the game without any heart or real passion. Money is more important than happiness to a lot of people because they believe that once they get the money,it will ultimately bring them happiness.
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0 # Lyndsey Morris 2014-03-01 22:29
I totally agree with this article! I think most people initially say they want to win and that's the reasoning behind practicing and playing the game, that's the whole point of it all isn't it? But when you really think about it they wouldn't want to practice and spend all their time getting ready for something just to either win or lose. I think it's deeper than that, it's the time spent pushing yourself to see what you can accomplish and how you can progress over time. The girl in your class is a great example, she thought she loved sports because of the winning and to see how the game ends. But in reality she liked the competition and fights, the drama in it. Isn't that what out society likes to watch anyways? Isn't that why we have reality shows, to watch the drama unfold? In games I think most people like to watch the leading up to the end, even if they doesn't notice that's what they like about it right away.
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0 # Jasmin Burgos 2014-03-02 06:29
I agree with Lindsey Morris, there has to be a deeper motive than just a win or lose. I do feel that competition and wanting to prove one self that we can accomplish what we set our minds to.
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0 # GA23 2014-03-01 23:09
I believe that all people have passion and have a competitive nature to them. We are social beings and anything that brings us together is satisfying, even if it is competitive. Having a passion for something makes someone less likely to want to do it for money. Someone with a passion wants to do whatever they are passionate about because it makes them feel fulfilled and if money is a bonus there is nothing wrong with that. Sports are competitive and it seems as if athletes are in that profession because they are passionate about that sport. Spectators watch because of the competitive nature of whatever sport they are watching. It is almost like watching a game for the thrill of it we want to witness what moves players will do for they are unexpected to us. Sports bring people together because of the competition aspect just like concerts bring people together because of how close we feel to other individuals who like the same music we do. It all goes back to passion, passion for some
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0 # GA23 2014-03-01 23:14
sport or some type of music. While watching a documentary called "Happy" directed by Roko Belic I learned that being in large groups can help us release "dopamine." Dopamine makes us feel pleasure and happiness. Sports help us release dopamine for the player it is released because of the exercise and exercise has the capacity to release dopamine. As for the spectators we release it when watching the game because when we watch games it is usually in big groups where we either agree or disagree. So I believe sports aren't always done for money because there is a passion and certain happiness they can bring to the players and its viewers.
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0 # OLI 2014-03-01 23:58
From my personal experience of riding my bicycle with groups, I ride to stay healthy and to get out of my house and to relieve stress. If money was involved that would be an added bonus. But I feel as there is that person who plays for the love of the game and a person who plays to earn that paycheck. We love entertainment, I know a lot of people who stopped watching the Super Bowl because it was a blow out. We love drama, of the USA team beating the Russian team in Hockey, we like Cinderella teams making it further then what people intended. But in the end we have to see what pays the bills because if you are not a winning head coach you get fired or no longer a superstar you lose a possible raise in your contract.
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0 # mv46 2014-03-02 03:23
I agree with this article that the money isn’t the main motivator for most competitors. Most competitors are in it for the pride they feel after achieving a goal. The feeling of working hard towards something and coming out the winner is the feeling they strive for and play for. I feel that the same applies to even everyday things like getting a job. This example can be put in that it isn’t the money that the job offers most of the time that makes a person happy; it’s the feeling that you passed the steps towards getting that job. It’s a feeling of victory that makes a person happy I believe. Yes, money does play a factor in many of the cases, but in general I believe that people just do it for their own satisfaction. They do things because they have a passion for it. Even a loser feels proud of finishing something. Whether it’s a regular job, a sport, or anything else people do; most tend to do it for the happiness.
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0 # LB11 2014-03-02 05:04
As far as sports I think it depends on how much you know about the game otherwise seeing only the outcome of the game might be sufficient enough for you. Hearing whether or not your favorite team won or lost might be all you need to know if you have no real knowledge about the sport. Lets take basketball for instance,if I know very little about basketball terminology or rules, most of the calls the refs made and the sports talk wouldn't make sense to me. If I couldn't even decipher between a foul and a travel, sitting through every last play and not knowing whats going on would be pointless. I am referring to of course the most extreme case of someone who knows nothing about sports and probably only watches sports for social purposes. For that reason I believe not enjoying a win because you didn't experience the process is only something people who have great knowledge about the game would be concerned about.
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0 # Crystal 2014-03-02 08:26
I believe if every professional athlete was not in it for the money, you would see a lot more teams winning. They would play and give it their "all" simply because they love what they do. Today, if a professional athlete gets hurt, they are not going to care because they have that mentality of, "At least I'm still getting paid." Athletes now perceive the whole, "I play for a professional team so weather or not I win or lose I'm still going home with a paycheck." That is why most athletes go with the team that is wiling to offer them more rather than going with a team that may not have so much potential. As a society people rather see excitement and drama rather than seeing a person or a team put on a boring fight. Its sad to say but that's what catches and drives people to do what they do today in society. Its the "excitement." For example, if two professional athletes do not like each other and are on different teams, of course everyone is going to want to see the game because they
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0 # Dennis Loo 2014-03-02 08:59
There wouldn't be more teams winning because if more teams won than there would have to be more corresponding losses for other teams. It is true, however, that morale matters. Most pros have real pride in what they do. They would not be pros otherwise. I am speaking here of most not all.
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0 # Crystal 2014-03-02 08:33
want to see who is going to put on a better fight. This type of situation refers back to people that are incarcerated. When one is released from prison and let out into society, most people are going to want to see that certain person fail, "lose," in society so that they can see them back in prison. While others will want to hear and see how that person made it through all of the challenges in society and still being able to succeed. Also referring to a person who "wins."
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0 # LeslieB 2014-03-02 09:12
I agree with the article that money is not the sole motivator for the athletes although I think it may be for the association of the sport to a certain extent. I think this provides a great example that although money does run the world and ambition and greed seems to be the sole motivator of everyone today, that perhaps we all have something bigger than money motivating us and we just need to dig a little deeper. So maybe there is hope to change the world into a place were humanity is valued more than money.
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0 # Denisse Adue 2014-03-08 05:56
I completely agree that there may be other motivating factors as opposed to money when playing sports professionally. I think that most players are trulynpassionat e about the sport that they are playing, and the majority if not all of them started playing the sport before they were even being paid to do so. There is nothing wrong with being good at something you enjoy doing and being paid to do it. Most players probably never saw themselves doing anything else, so they practiced as hard as they could because they felt that being a professional sports player was their destiny. It takes a lot of extensive practice and training, and although it's entertains to play, I'm sure it's not always easy. It's still considered work. And just like in any other job, aren't the majority of us always seeking ways to excel and perhaps get a pay raise? There is nothing wrong with that. Unfortunately we live in a money and power society so we do what we can to succeed.
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0 # Denisse Adue 2014-03-08 05:59
I completely agree that there may be other motivating factors as opposed to money when playing sports professionally. I think that most players are truly passionate about the sport that they are playing, and the majority if not all of them started playing the sport before they were even being paid to do so. There is nothing wrong with being good at something you enjoy doing and being paid to do it. Most players probably never saw themselves doing anything else, so they practiced as hard as they could because they felt that being a professional sports player was their destiny. It takes a lot of extensive practice and training, and although it's entertaining to play, I'm sure it's not always easy. It's still considered work. And just like in any other job, aren't the majority of us always seeking ways to excel and perhaps get a pay raise? There is nothing wrong with that. Unfortunately we live in a money and power driven society so we do what we can to succeed.
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0 # marym 2014-03-02 19:48
Money can be the motivator for some athletes having the pay increase in sports have changed the game of sports because many are just looking to get the biggest pay cut while others are looking at what team they can benefit from and what will help them gain experience. In the case of winning a game I think that more people would say that it always better to watch a game that have a challenge in oppose to watching a team win by a large gap because it take away from the excitement experience in watching the game a perfect example would be the super game that just passed many laughed on how it was won and many stopped watching it because you already knew who was going to win .
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0 # PD06 2014-03-04 06:38
I agree with this article that money is not the the main motivator for things such as sports. I am a die hard Lakers fan and no matter how bad of a season they are having, I don't stop watching since they are losing. Instead I continue to watch due to the love for the sport and that is more important then the winning.
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0 # mart909 2014-03-04 20:25
Part 1: I do not feel that money is the main reason for MOST athletes. Sports in my opinion are filled with interest within the lines and passion for the game. Yes there are certain athletes who might work hard to get a huge paycheck and then after signing the long term contract they just fall apart, Pujols for example. And then there are those who strive to be the best and leave a mark in history by showing the love for the game without stopping their hard work to get better each day not for the money but for the rest of it that comes with it, like Bryant.
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0 # mart909 2014-03-04 20:25
Part 2: In my personal experience I just recently joined a basketball team and we just lost for the first time, it was disappointing because we obviously want to win because that's just in the nature of the sport however it was not something big because it still feels good to compete and be able to show our abilities that we practice on day after day. Money does not matter to us obviously, we actually pay in order to play. Everyone grows up playing without a paycheck, they have to love the sport in order to be good at it and then when they turn professionals they get that extra part out of it which is money.
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0 # dgjr_91 2014-03-04 22:37
Although not at the professional level, as a college athlete myself I find this article very, very interesting. I don't believe that money and winning is 'everything', but I do believe money and winning (together) is most of it. If we look at today's sports industry, professional athletes are paid millions of dollars to become part of a teams journey to doing what, winning. Every athletes goal during a match, race, or fight is to get the WIN by the end of the competition, while getting paid big bucks to do so, as well as doing something that you have a passion for. As an athlete myself, we athletes all wish to someday have a career in our desired sports big leagues and make big bucks. Personal story: In all honesty, one factor that helped me determine what University I was going to attend was money. As a college athlete, I made my final school choice to pursue my soccer career and education at a school that would offer me the biggest athletic scholarship.
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0 # dgjr_91 2014-03-04 22:39
Cont...
Of course, as well as joining a program who had a good team and winning mentality. Yes, what I wanted was money to help me pay for my education, but at the same time do something I loved to do while in the process of receiving an education.
This article really makes me think about things and double guess myself because I believe that as a player, yes it is all about winning. I love the sport, and yes I love the challenge and competition of going against an opponent, but the competition and drama is not what I find most gratifying, the feeling of winning is what I find most gratifying and important. For example, this is why during championship matches for example, when you have team huddles and talks before the start of the game we are often told by our coaches and teammates, “This is it! It comes down to this game. This is what we’ve been working so hard for! Lets go get this Championship win!” WINNING a championship is what it all comes down to.
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0 # dgjr_91 2014-03-04 22:39
Cont...
But yes, [“it is the doing of what you didn’t think you could do, the stretching to excel in the face of fear and difficulty against a determined and powerful adversary, which sometimes can be your own fears, and succeeding”] that makes that win feel so much more gratifying. Now I say it is all about winning, but then quotes like this are what make me question myself, “Ask a top athlete – or even a weekend warrior – if they would be happy to be given the championship trophy through their opponent defaulting before the final. Almost all would say that they would much rather win it through having to take on and beat a formidable competitor.” This is true. I understand the main point of the article is that winning and money are not the main motivators behind why people pursue sports, but for some reason I continue to believe that sometimes, for some, these are the main motivators.
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0 # Denisse Adue 2014-03-06 05:35
I think that the desire to win, whether you are paid to play or not, has a lot to do with bragging rights. People want to take pride in having not only competed, but having come out on top as well. A lot of people measure skill by the number of wins, whether it be in the form of money, trophies, certificates, or just a mere pat on the back. The more you win, the better you look. People will also think of you more highly if you are a champion. Sports fans are not being paid to watch their team play, and unless they have made a bet, they do not get a cut if their team wins so why is it that they want their team to defeat the opponent so badly? For the ability to say that their team is better. As far as the teams themselves, of course they want to win because the feeling they get when having done so is very rewarding. But I also think the reason they do what they do is because they enjoy it. Getting paid to do it is just a huge bonus. Don't we all want to get paid to do what we love?
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0 # Katgrl15 2014-03-07 20:05
When it comes to sports, I absolutely enjoy watching players compete against one another to win, especially when it comes to football. When I am watching football, I never look at the players and I think "this game is being played because they get paid millions," and some people believe that sports is interchangeable with money. Players that choose to play a sport have to have some type of passion for what they are doing to make such a long commitment when signing into a contact. Also, going back to football, the players I always see playing are playing to their best ability and I never see a player simply give up or stop playing because negotiations of their pay may be at bay or is the current the media, they just play to win.
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0 # Rod24 2014-03-09 07:31
I agree with you most players seem to play for the love of the game not for other reasons. Although they do get paid lots of money I don't think that has much effect on their performance when it comes down to it.
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0 # Katgrl15 2014-03-07 20:15
I do believe that every working class citizen needs money in order to survive and live life comfortably. When people think of professional players they automatically think they are playing to entertain the public, which is true, and expect a high salary rate. I think money is not the sole and ultimate reason behind why players are playing the game, I think they are passionate about their profession and are getting for paid a service of providing worldwide entertainment. I agree with some of the other comments and how money is just an added bonus for being apart of a high profiled and media driven profession, it is expected to get paid. My boyfriend is really close friends with one of the Super Bowl winning team the Seattle Seahawks and he would tell me that this player loved football and was just happy to be part of the league. Never once did he mention how he wanted to get paid and that would be the only way he would play. Most people can confuse sports with money hungry players.
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0 # debdawg91 2014-03-09 04:25
Everyone has their own intentions when becoming involved in anything. For sports, some people can be in for the money and some will be in for the love of the sport.In the past many participated because they loved what they did and they wanted to share their talent with the rest of the world. Not fast forwarding to now its all about the money. Who can get the most of it by using their talents as a way to become rich. However, money is not always the only factor for doing what they do. Many play and many go to see a game for entertainment and for the love a game. People love to see a good game/competitio n or else people would lose interest and sports would not be so popular.
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0 # Rod24 2014-03-09 07:29
I have always viewed professional athletes as playing for the love of the game, not the money. But, I did feel that that the players think even if they did loose it didn't make much difference because they are still getting paid. There are many other professions which they could have majored in to make good money.
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0 # AEK 2014-03-10 02:41
Much of what we do in the world is driven by money. We are in a capitalist society; that effects nearly every aspect of our lives, even sports. Some athletes are paid too much money. If they are paid a lot of money on one team, they most likely will not play on another team for anything less, because they know they do not have too. Teams want the best players to they can succeed and win, therefore they pay for the best players. There are bidding wars, negotiations, and trading deals that perpetuate the ridiculousness of salaries in sports. If winning did not matter, then the money would not be spent or regarded as so important.
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0 # Dennis Loo 2014-03-10 04:18
I'm not arguing that money is of no consequence. I'm arguing that it's not the main thing. While athletes are paid well today and the franchise players paid huge sums, the owners and companies like ESPN are the ones who are actually making the biggest bucks.
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0 # Dennis Loo 2014-03-10 04:20
Oh, and there are cases where star players take smaller pay deals in order to play for the honor of the championship or who agree to lowered salaries so that the team they're on can afford some other talent. If money were everything they wouldn't do that.
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0 # sintricity08 2014-03-10 06:11
After reading this article I feel like I have to agree with what Loo states when he states the fact that athletes love and strive for the competition of the sport more so than money. But what I feel is the hidden message here is that sports would still exist even if little to no money was involved. Sure, money is quite the temptation for many people going into sports and athletes usually strive towards the better deal, but money wasn't the starting factor for many people who started playing sports. I feel the love of the game and the competition was what brought most athletes into the sports realm we have, and even if money was no longer a concept, I would bet that we would still get to watch the best athletes compete in the sports we love to watch.
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0 # Dennis Loo 2014-03-10 06:14
Quoting sintricity08:
] what I feel is the hidden message here is that sports would still exist even if little to no money was involved...the love of the game and the competition was what brought most athletes into the sports realm we have, and even if money was no longer a concept, I would bet that we would still get to watch the best athletes compete in the sports we love to watch.
Bingo!
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Elaine Brower 2

Elaine Brower of World Can't Wait speaking at the NYC Stop the War on Iran rally 2/4/12